heyoscarwilde:

I’ve gotten a few notes from people wanting me to re-up the zip file containing the long out of print The Star Wars Iron On Transfer Book images from 1978 that I had originally uploaded to megaupload a year ago. 

The new link is http://depositfiles.com/files/fjyk2j3m6

Instructions below from my original post on how to best use these.

Go and make cool stuff!

Here’s a Christmas gift for you.

All 16 Star Wars iron on transfers taken from The Star Wars Iron On Transfer Book (Ballantine Books/1978).

Download the zip file with all 16 optimized images at <link redacted>   (if this doesn’t work or expires, shoot me a message and I’ll re-up.  I just tested it and it works fine).

Print the image you choose on the highest quality on special iron on paper (the Epson offering seems to get good reviews on amazon) and transfer to your t-shirt. Actual image size is 5 1/2 inches by 7 inches. 

Thanks for following me these past few months.

☾∧† ◯: SOPA Emergency IP list

convertedinvader:

burt-reynolds-xmas-special:

kshandra:

underwatermess:

So when these assfucks in DC decide to ruin the internet, here’s how to access your favorite sites in the event of a DNS takedown

tumblr.com 174.121.194.34
wikipedia.org 208.80.152.201

# News
 

scottlava:

“So much time and so little to do. Wait a minute. Strike that. Reverse  it.”

scottlava:

“So much time and so little to do. Wait a minute. Strike that. Reverse it.”

Posted on November 23, 2011

Reblogged from:

Source: scottlava

Notes: 72,072 notes

Jean Delville, Parsifal

Posted on November 18, 2011

Reblogged from: ☾∧† ◯

Source: deadpaint

Notes: 535 notes

superstarling:

Rob Foote’s plant/animal chimera drawings rock.

Posted on November 17, 2011

Reblogged from:

Source: etsy.com

Notes: 8,035 notes

Posted on November 3, 2011

Reblogged from:

Notes: 10,365 notes

threadless:

“Shhhh. That boy is dreaming…”  Dreaming by Florent Bodart is up for scoring now.

theearthcharity:

Bortle Dark-Sky Scale
The Bortle Dark-Sky Scale is a nine-level numeric scale that measures the night sky’s and stars’ brightness of a particular location. John E. Bortle created the scale and published it in Sky &amp; Telescope magazine to help amateur astronomers compare the darkness of observing sites. The scale ranges from Class 1, the darkest skies available on Earth, through Class 9, inner-city skies.
Excellent dark-sky site - Zodiacal light, gegenschein, zodiacal band visible; M33 direct vision naked-eye object; Scorpius and Sagittarius regions of the Milky Way cast obvious shadows on the ground; airglow is readily visible; Jupiter and Venus affect dark adaptation; surroundings basically invisible.
Typical truly dark site [not pictured] - Airglow weakly visible near horizon; M33 easily seen with naked eye; highly structured summer Milky Way; distinctly yellowish zodiacal light bright enough to cast shadows at dusk and dawn; clouds only visible as dark holes; surroundings still only barely visible silhouetted against the sky; manyMessier globular clusters still distinct naked-eye objects.
Rural sky - Some light pollution evident at the horizon; clouds illuminated near horizon, dark overhead; Milky Way still appears complex; M15, M4, M5, and M22distinct naked-eye objects; M33 easily visible with averted vision; zodiacal light striking in spring and autumn, color still visible; nearer surroundings vaguely visible.
Rural/suburban transition [not pictured] - Light pollution domes visible in various directions over the horizon; zodiacal light is still visible, but not even halfway extending to the zenith at dusk or dawn; Milky Way above the horizon still impressive, but lacks most of the finer details; M33 a difficult averted vision object, only visible when higher than 55°; clouds illuminated in the directions of the light sources, but still dark overhead; surroundings clearly visible, even at a distance.
Suburban sky - Only hints of zodiacal light are seen on the best nights in autumn and spring; Milky Way is very weak or invisible near the horizon and looks washed out overhead; light sources visible in most, if not all, directions; clouds are noticeably brighter than the sky.
Bright suburban sky [not pictured] - Zodiacal light is invisible; Milky Way only visible near the zenith; sky within 35° from the horizon glows grayish white; clouds anywhere in the sky appear fairly bright; surroundings easily visible; M33 is impossible to see without at least binoculars, M31 is modestly apparent to the unaided eye.
Suburban/urban transition or Full Moon - Entire sky has a grayish-white hue; strong light sources evident in all directions; Milky Way invisible; M31 and M44 may be glimpsed with the naked eye, but are very indistinct; clouds are brightly lit; even in moderate-sized telescopes the brightest Messier objects are only ghosts of their true selves. At a full moon night the sky is not better than this rating even at the darkest locations with the difference that the sky appears more blue than orangish white at otherwise dark locations.
City sky [not pictured] - Sky glows white or orange—one can easily read; M31 and M44 are barely glimpsed by an experienced observer on good nights; even with telescope, only bright Messier objects can be detected; stars forming familiar constellation patterns may be weak or completely invisible.
Inner-city sky - Sky is brilliantly lit, with many stars forming constellations invisible and many weaker constellations invisible; aside from Pleiades, no Messier object is visible to the naked eye; only objects to provide fairly pleasant views are the Moon, the planets, and a few of the brightest star clusters.

theearthcharity:

Bortle Dark-Sky Scale

The Bortle Dark-Sky Scale is a nine-level numeric scale that measures the night sky’s and stars’ brightness of a particular location. John E. Bortle created the scale and published it in Sky & Telescope magazine to help amateur astronomers compare the darkness of observing sites. The scale ranges from Class 1, the darkest skies available on Earth, through Class 9, inner-city skies.

  1. Excellent dark-sky siteZodiacal lightgegenschein, zodiacal band visible; M33 direct vision naked-eye object; Scorpius and Sagittarius regions of the Milky Way cast obvious shadows on the ground; airglow is readily visible; Jupiter and Venus affect dark adaptation; surroundings basically invisible.
  2. Typical truly dark site [not pictured] - Airglow weakly visible near horizon; M33 easily seen with naked eye; highly structured summer Milky Way; distinctly yellowish zodiacal light bright enough to cast shadows at dusk and dawn; clouds only visible as dark holes; surroundings still only barely visible silhouetted against the sky; manyMessier globular clusters still distinct naked-eye objects.
  3. Rural sky - Some light pollution evident at the horizon; clouds illuminated near horizon, dark overhead; Milky Way still appears complex; M15M4M5, and M22distinct naked-eye objects; M33 easily visible with averted vision; zodiacal light striking in spring and autumn, color still visible; nearer surroundings vaguely visible.
  4. Rural/suburban transition [not pictured] - Light pollution domes visible in various directions over the horizon; zodiacal light is still visible, but not even halfway extending to the zenith at dusk or dawn; Milky Way above the horizon still impressive, but lacks most of the finer details; M33 a difficult averted vision object, only visible when higher than 55°; clouds illuminated in the directions of the light sources, but still dark overhead; surroundings clearly visible, even at a distance.
  5. Suburban sky - Only hints of zodiacal light are seen on the best nights in autumn and spring; Milky Way is very weak or invisible near the horizon and looks washed out overhead; light sources visible in most, if not all, directions; clouds are noticeably brighter than the sky.
  6. Bright suburban sky [not pictured] - Zodiacal light is invisible; Milky Way only visible near the zenith; sky within 35° from the horizon glows grayish white; clouds anywhere in the sky appear fairly bright; surroundings easily visible; M33 is impossible to see without at least binoculars, M31 is modestly apparent to the unaided eye.
  7. Suburban/urban transition or Full Moon - Entire sky has a grayish-white hue; strong light sources evident in all directions; Milky Way invisible; M31 and M44 may be glimpsed with the naked eye, but are very indistinct; clouds are brightly lit; even in moderate-sized telescopes the brightest Messier objects are only ghosts of their true selves. At a full moon night the sky is not better than this rating even at the darkest locations with the difference that the sky appears more blue than orangish white at otherwise dark locations.
  8. City sky [not pictured] - Sky glows white or orange—one can easily read; M31 and M44 are barely glimpsed by an experienced observer on good nights; even with telescope, only bright Messier objects can be detected; stars forming familiar constellation patterns may be weak or completely invisible.
  9. Inner-city sky - Sky is brilliantly lit, with many stars forming constellations invisible and many weaker constellations invisible; aside from Pleiades, no Messier object is visible to the naked eye; only objects to provide fairly pleasant views are the Moon, the planets, and a few of the brightest star clusters.
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